Honey and Almond Bar

This is another product from my healthy line products. I have first create a Bi-fold brochure/leaflet and than I thought why not add more products.

I have created few healthy bars packaging so this one is new one.

For honey bees to produce honey, they consume pollen and nectar from a variety of flowers. Honey bees are attracted to gardens and fields that offer a variety of flowering vegetation.

Pollen, a powdery dust-like substance, is produced by various flowering plants. Pollen is one of the purest and richest natural foods, containing all of the nutritional requirements of a honey bee: sugar, carbohydrates, protein, enzymes, vitamins and minerals. Nectar is a sweet fluid found in flowers. Honey bees collect nectar and convert it to honey.

The majority of honey bee larvae eat honey, but larvae that are chosen to become future queens will be fed with royal jelly. Royal jelly is a white secretion produced by young, female worker bees. It is comprised of pollen and chemicals from the glands of worker bees. Royal jelly contains dietary supplements, fertility stimulants and other medicines, as well as B vitamins. Workers and drones are fed royal jelly during the first few days of larval development, while future queen larvae consume royal jelly throughout their development.

Since chosen honey bee queens eat only royal jelly, they grow quickly and become twice the size of an ordinary honey bee. Due to the rich nutritional value of royal jelly, queens can survive five years and lay up to 2,000 eggs each day.

Honey bees collect pollen and nectar from a variety of flowering plants, including milkweed, dandelions, clover, goldenrod and a variety of fruit trees. Only workers forage for food, consuming as much nectar from each flower as they can. After foraging, worker honey bees return to the hive and pass the collected nectar to another worker. This worker holds the nectar on her tongue until the liquid evaporates, creating honey. The honey is then stored in a cell within the hive.

My Honey and almond bar is only mockup, but I will think about eating honey twice now.

Why don’t vegans eat honey?

Bees do not make honey for us, they make it for their hive. To take it from them when they have no possible way to consent to producing honey for us is morally and ethically wrong, and does not align itself with the vegan lifestyle.

Commercial beehives built to allow humans to take honey from bees are not natural; they are engineered. The queen bee is manipulated to remain in the hive, and her worker bees will not desert her. When humans want to steal their honey, honey bees are forcibly subdued and intentionally made confused, before the honey they made for themselves is taken from them and sold for profit.

I am also adding Honey & Almond Crackers

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Apple Snack Packaging

For this post I have created another packaging. This time the miracle food is apple crisps.

As one of the most cultivated and consumed fruits in the world, apples are continuously being praised as a “miracle food”.

In fact, apples were ranked first in Medical News Today’s featured article about the top 10 healthy foods.

Apples are extremely rich in important antioxidants, flavanoids, and dietary fiber.

The phytonutrients and antioxidants in apples may help reduce the risk of developing cancer, hypertension, diabetes, and heart disease.

Dried Fruit Factors

As water evaporates during drying, the fruit shrinks in size and the remaining nutrients become more concentrated. In spite of the size differences, ChooseMyPlate.gov makes it easy to compare dried to fresh fruit because it defines 1/2 cup of dried fruit as equal to 1 cup of fresh fruit. Fruits are often treated before being dried to preserve the natural color and prevent bacterial growth. The treatments may be natural substances, such as lemon juice and vitamin C, or they may consist of sulfur or sulfites. If you have asthma or you’re allergic to sulfites, avoid treated dried fruit.

Sulphites are substances that are naturally found in some foods. They are used as an additive to maintain food colour, shelf-life and prevent the growth of fungi or bacteria. Sulphites are also used in food packaging like cellophane.