With this post I am continuing with my healthy theme. I have used the same design elements as with the previous products.

The color theme I was trying to keep in the same color as the actual beetroot which in this case is pink.

The software used is Adobe Photoshop.

An introduction to beetroot

Like many modern vegetables, beetroot was first cultivated by the Romans. By the 19th century it held great commercial value when it was discovered that beets could be converted into sugar. Today, the leading commercial producers include the USA, Russia, France, Poland and Germany. Many classic beetroot recipes are associated with central and Eastern Europe including the famous beetroot soup known as borscht. Beetroot’s earthy charm has resulted in its ubiquitous influence on fashionable menus and recipes. Its delicious but distinctive flavour and nutritional status have escalated it to the root you can’t beat!

Belonging to the same family as chard and spinach, both the leaves and root can be eaten – the leaves have a bitter taste whereas the round root is sweet. Typically a rich purple color, beetroot can also be white or golden. Due to its high sugar content, beetroot is delicious eaten raw but is more typically cooked or pickled.

Nutritional highlights

Beetroot is of exceptional nutritional value; especially the greens, which are rich in calcium, iron and vitamins A and C. Beetroots are an excellent source of folic acid and a very good source of fiber, manganese and potassium. The greens should not be overlooked; they can be cooked up and enjoyed in the same way as spinach.


 

A 100g serving of raw beets provides:
36 kcals   1.7g protein   0.1g fat     7.6g carbs2.5g fiber     

Historical health uses

The plant pigment that gives beetroot its rich, purple-crimson color is betacyanin; a powerful agent, thought to help suppress the development of some types of cancer.

Beetroot is rich in fiber, exerting favorable effects on bowel function, which may assist in preventing constipation and help to lower cholesterol levels too.

Research

Beetroot fiber has been shown to increase the number of white blood cells, which are responsible for detecting and eliminating abnormal cells. Red beetroots have been ranked as one of the 10 most potent antioxidant vegetables and are also one of the richest sources of glutamine, an amino acid, essential to the health and maintenance of the intestinal tract.

Other studies have looked at the effect of beetroot juice on blood pressure. A reduction in blood pressure is beneficial for the avoidance of heart disease and stroke. Studies state that nitrate rich foods like beetroot may help in heart attack survival.

Beetroot juice has gained popularity since Paralympic gold medalist David Weir announced that a shot of the juice was his secret to success.

I am slightly tweaking the design in those.

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