With this new post I am continuing with my photomontage theme. I have created this work a while ago, but felt it is still quite current theme.

Nowdays I sometimes feel like a participant in The Big Brother so for this reason I have decided to create this artwork.

The original arwork which I have created a kaleidoscop you see I used here had been done by Karel Teige.

Karel Teige who was a Czech modernist avant-garde artist, writer, critic
and one of the most important figures of the 1920s and 1930s movement. He was a member of the Devětsil (Butterbur) movement in the 1920s and also worked as an editor and graphic designer for Devětsil’s monthly magazine ReD (Revue Devětsilu). One of his major works on ar chitecture
theory is The Minimum Dwelling (1932).

Minimum Dwelling is one of the landmark architectural books of the twentieth century. The Minimum Dwelling is not just a book on architecture, but also a blueprint for a new way of living. It calls for a radical rethinking of domestic space and of the role of modern architecture in the planning, design, and construction of new dwelling types for the proletariat. Teige shows how Gropius, Le Corbusier, Mies van der Rohe, and others designed little more than new versions of baroque palaces, mainly for the new financial aristocracy. Teige envisioned the minimum dwelling not as a reduced version of a bourgeois apartment or rural cottage, but as a wholly new dwelling type built on the cooperation of architects, sociologists, economists, health officials, physicians, social workers, politicians, and trade unionists. The book covers many subjects that are still of great relevance. Of particular interest are Teige’s rejection of traditional notions of the kitchen as the core of family-centered plans and of marriage as the foundation of modern cohabitation. He describes alternative lifestyles and new ways of cohabitation of sexes, generations, and classes. The detailed programmatic chapters on collective housing remain far ahead of current thinking, and his comments on collective dwelling presage communal living experiments of the 1960s and 1970s, as well as the communal facilities in contemporary condominium buildings and retirement communities.

I sincerely hope he wouldn’t mind me using it.

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